npr:

Schizophrenia typically starts in the late teens or early 20s. But if you could stop that first psychotic break, could you stop the mental illness in its tracks? Some doctors think so.
Halting Schizophrenia Before It Starts
Caption: Meghan, 23, began experiencing hallucinations at 19. “Driving home, cars’ headlights turned into eyes. The grills on the cars turned into mouths and none of them looked happy. It would scare the crap out of me,” Meghan says.
Photo Credit: Marvi Lacar for NPR

npr:

Schizophrenia typically starts in the late teens or early 20s. But if you could stop that first psychotic break, could you stop the mental illness in its tracks? Some doctors think so.

Halting Schizophrenia Before It Starts

Caption: Meghan, 23, began experiencing hallucinations at 19. “Driving home, cars’ headlights turned into eyes. The grills on the cars turned into mouths and none of them looked happy. It would scare the crap out of me,” Meghan says.

Photo Credit: Marvi Lacar for NPR

257 notes

expose-the-light:

Beautiful Chemistry: Amazing Chemical Reactions by Yan Liang

(Source: thisiscolossal.com)

247 notes

jtotheizzoe:

explore-blog:

Charming visualization from this altogether delightful children’s book about space – an imaginative and illuminating primer on the cosmos to spark awe in the souls of budding Sagans. 

Perhaps one day, we will journey to distant po-tay-toes?

jtotheizzoe:

explore-blog:

Charming visualization from this altogether delightful children’s book about space – an imaginative and illuminating primer on the cosmos to spark awe in the souls of budding Sagans. 

Perhaps one day, we will journey to distant po-tay-toes?

14,959 notes

intrainingdoc:

Learn your surgical terms! This is a lifesaver for students in the operating room.

intrainingdoc:

Learn your surgical terms! This is a lifesaver for students in the operating room.

4,831 notes

biocanvas:

Breathing tubes of a silkworm
A silkworm is the caterpillar of the domesticated silkmoth, Bombyx mori. Domesticated silkworms are entirely dependent on humans for survival, where they are mass bred to produce silk. The silk from Bombyx mori is more fragile and delicate than spider silk, which is five times stronger than steel but harder to obtain than its silkworm counterpart. Scientists in Japan have recently introduced a gene encoding spider silk into silkworms, producing silk that is 50% stronger and could be invaluable in manufacturing protective suits and better surgical sutures.
Image by Michael Gibson.

biocanvas:

Breathing tubes of a silkworm

A silkworm is the caterpillar of the domesticated silkmoth, Bombyx mori. Domesticated silkworms are entirely dependent on humans for survival, where they are mass bred to produce silk. The silk from Bombyx mori is more fragile and delicate than spider silk, which is five times stronger than steel but harder to obtain than its silkworm counterpart. Scientists in Japan have recently introduced a gene encoding spider silk into silkworms, producing silk that is 50% stronger and could be invaluable in manufacturing protective suits and better surgical sutures.

Image by Michael Gibson.

381 notes

scienceisbeauty:

Light Printing

We are exploring new modalities of creative photography through robotics and long-exposure photography. Using a robotic arm, a light source is carried through precise movements in front of a camera. Photographic compositions are recorded as images of volumetric light. Robotic light “painting” can also be inverted: the camera is moved via the arm to create an image “painted” with environmental light. Finally, adding real-time sensor input to the moving arm and programming it to explore the physical space around objects can reveal immaterial fields like radio waves, magnetic fields, and heat flows.

Via Mediated Matter (MIT)

2,571 notes

spring-of-mathematics:

Mathematics and Traditional Cuisine

The mathematics of Pasta: A process analysis to find unity, formulas and ways to express structure mathematics of pasta shapes, by their mathematical and geometric properties.
See more at: The Maths of Pasta by George L. Legendre.

Image: 

  • 'Pasta By Design' - Created by a team of designers, ‘Pasta by Design’ book reveals the hidden mathematical beauty of pasta: its geometrical shapes and surfaces are explained by mathematical formulae, drawings and illustrations.
  • Animated gifs - From video: The traditional pasta making techniques used at Della Terra Pasta by Chris Becker [Video] - shared at here.

Types of Pasta in the post (From left to right):  Agnolotti - Tortellini - Saccottini - Sagne Incannulate - Pappardelle.

7,235 notes

birdandmoon:

Dating isn’t easy, no matter who you are. This is a great Attenborough clip about wasps and orchids.
Original is on my site here.

birdandmoon:

Dating isn’t easy, no matter who you are. This is a great Attenborough clip about wasps and orchids.

Original is on my site here.

13,521 notes

afro-dominicano:

archiemcphee:

The work of Paris-based artist and E.N.S.A.D. researcher Lia Giraud is further proof that Science + Art = Awesome. These green photos weren’t taken, they were grown. Giraud cultures microscopic algae to form living landscapes and portraits. They aren’t photographs, they’re ‘algaegraphs.’

"The technique is similar to photography, but the photosensitivity of silver grains [in film] is replaced by photosensitive organisms: microalgae," says Giraud, 29.

To create each “algaegraph”, Giraud immerses the algae in a Petri dish filled with a mix of chemical nutrients, and exposes them to an image. “The cells react to the light and form solids of different densities,” she explains.

The outline of the image forms in just a few minutes, but it can take up to four days to achieve the final result. Click here to learn more.

[via designboom and Wired]

These are the best ones I’ve seen yet, fucking amazing.

1,056 notes

compoundchem:

kem-ist:

smilesandvials:

kem-ist:

compoundchem:

It’s National Tequila Day in the US today! Check out this graphic from Reactions to learn about the chemistry of tequila - and how scientists have found a way to turn tequila into diamonds.

Would you like to know why Methanol is so bad for you? Why it gives you those “wicked hangovers”? It’s not the methanol itself but what your body turns it into. There is an enzyme in your body called alcohol dehydrogenase. It does as the name implies, dehydrates alcohols— including ethanol (“alcohol”) and methanol. So when it dehydrates methanol it turns it into formaldehyde. If you don’t know a lot of biology or toxicology, formaldehyde is a very toxic and a known human carcinogen. A third of an ounce (10 mL) will kill an adult. So really be careful how much you drink.

Most luckily though, alcohol dehydrogenase prefers ethanol to methanol by far. (Prefers ethanol to methanol by ~10-20 fold). It would much rather uptake ethanol and not bother converting the methanol (so it leaves as relatively harmless waste). This is why the antidote for methanol poisoning is actually just ethanol. (x,x) I have observed students, over 21, splash methanol on themselves in lab and simply walked to the bar, purchased a few shots and a sandwich and gotten on with their day. (Methanol does go through skin and of course drinking it would be much more serious but a drink is a medically valid precautionary method of treatment in case of spill.)

Drink too much tequila? Drink other alcoholic beverages! Lol.

One of my chemistry lecturers at uni jovially stated in a lecture, “It’s fine if you drink methanol, as long as you drink plenty more ethanol!” I’m guessing he realised later that the message was probably a little too casual, as he hurriedly sent an email around, the sole text of which was: “Please don’t drink methanol.”

compoundchem:

kem-ist:

smilesandvials:

kem-ist:

compoundchem:

It’s National Tequila Day in the US today! Check out this graphic from Reactions to learn about the chemistry of tequila - and how scientists have found a way to turn tequila into diamonds.

Would you like to know why Methanol is so bad for you? Why it gives you those “wicked hangovers”? It’s not the methanol itself but what your body turns it into. There is an enzyme in your body called alcohol dehydrogenase. It does as the name implies, dehydrates alcohols— including ethanol (“alcohol”) and methanol. So when it dehydrates methanol it turns it into formaldehyde. If you don’t know a lot of biology or toxicology, formaldehyde is a very toxic and a known human carcinogen. A third of an ounce (10 mL) will kill an adult. So really be careful how much you drink.

Most luckily though, alcohol dehydrogenase prefers ethanol to methanol by far. (Prefers ethanol to methanol by ~10-20 fold). It would much rather uptake ethanol and not bother converting the methanol (so it leaves as relatively harmless waste). This is why the antidote for methanol poisoning is actually just ethanol. (x,x

I have observed students, over 21, splash methanol on themselves in lab and simply walked to the bar, purchased a few shots and a sandwich and gotten on with their day. (Methanol does go through skin and of course drinking it would be much more serious but a drink is a medically valid precautionary method of treatment in case of spill.)

Drink too much tequila? Drink other alcoholic beverages! Lol.

One of my chemistry lecturers at uni jovially stated in a lecture, “It’s fine if you drink methanol, as long as you drink plenty more ethanol!” 

I’m guessing he realised later that the message was probably a little too casual, as he hurriedly sent an email around, the sole text of which was: “Please don’t drink methanol.”

740 notes

kqedscience:


The CPR We Don’t See on TV
“Some have suggested that misrepresentations of CPR on television may lead patients to have unrealistic expectations of what the procedure entails and the likelihood of success. Survival rates for patients receiving CPR on popular, prime-time medical TV shows have traditionally been much higher than in the real world. One study found that 75 percent of TV patients who receive CPR are alive immediately after, and 67 percent of patients survive in the long term. Other research has shown that though recent shows like “Grey’s Anatomy” have more accurate immediate survival rates, they are still misleading.”
Read more from The Well blog at the nytimes.

kqedscience:

The CPR We Don’t See on TV

Some have suggested that misrepresentations of CPR on television may lead patients to have unrealistic expectations of what the procedure entails and the likelihood of success. Survival rates for patients receiving CPR on popular, prime-time medical TV shows have traditionally been much higher than in the real world. One study found that 75 percent of TV patients who receive CPR are alive immediately after, and 67 percent of patients survive in the long term. Other research has shown that though recent shows like “Grey’s Anatomy” have more accurate immediate survival rates, they are still misleading.”

Read more from The Well blog at the nytimes.

173 notes

grabmyballs:

Minimal Posters - Six Women Who Changed Science and The World.

1,210 notes

teded:

Ketchup is part of a merry band of liquids called Non-Newtonian fluids. Mayonnaise, toothpaste, blood, paint, peanut butter and lots of other fluids respond to force non-linearly. That is, their apparent thickness changes depending on how hard you push, or how long, or how fast.
From the TED-Ed Lesson Why is ketchup so hard to pour? - George Zaidan
Animation by TOGETHER

teded:

Ketchup is part of a merry band of liquids called Non-Newtonian fluids. Mayonnaise, toothpaste, blood, paint, peanut butter and lots of other fluids respond to force non-linearly. That is, their apparent thickness changes depending on how hard you push, or how long, or how fast.

From the TED-Ed Lesson Why is ketchup so hard to pour? - George Zaidan

Animation by TOGETHER

269 notes

teded:

A Guide to the Energy of the Earth

Energy moves in and out of Earth’s physical systems, and during any energy transfer between them, some energy is lost to the surroundings as heat, light, sound, vibration, or movement.

Our planet’s energy comes from internal and external sources. Geothermal energy from radioactive isotopes and rotational energy from the spinning of the Earth are internal sources of energy, while the Sun is the major external source, driving certain systems, like our weather and our climate.

Sunlight warms the surface and atmosphere in varying amounts, and this causes convection, producing winds and influencing ocean currents. Infrared radiation, radiating out from the warmed surface of the Earth, gets trapped by greenhouse gases and further affects the energy flow.

From the TED-Ed Lesson A guide to the energy of the Earth - Joshua M. Sneideman

Animation by Marc Christoforidis

4,197 notes